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In The News

We are sharing these articles and websites that might be of interest to you.
We may not agree with everything...but it's food for thought and
good information to have as we support our students as they make their post high plans.
By: Mark Kantrowitz
September 28, 2018

Click here or on the title.
An excellent primer on how to pay for college.
5 Extracurricular Tips to Boost College Admissions
Teenagers can boost their college admission chances by being smart about the extracurricular activities that they pursue in high school.

Unfortunately, a lot of misinformation exists about extracurriculars which prevents students from making the most of their activities outside the classroom.

In my latest blog post, I capture some of educational consultant Shirag Shemmassian's valuable extracurricular advice. He shared his thoughts during a live event earlier in the month for individuals who belong to my membership community called, The College Solution Insider.
 
Click on the graphic for the valuable tips.
Updated August 9, 2018 by Rick Clark
Here are the questions students should really ask when looking for a "best school."
Mark McConville (July 26, 2018) is a psychologist who helps parents and families be college-ready.
Ashley Gross and Jon Marcus, April 25, 2018
Success options through good jobs in skilled trades are explored as an alternative to a four year college.
Middle Class Families Increasingly Look at Community Colleges 

 

New York Times April 5, 2018

 

With college prices in the hundreds of thousands of dollars, more middle-class families are looking for ways to spend less for quality education.

 

University of Hawaiʻi System News

UH community college students offered seamless transfer to four-year campuses

UH News
February 6, 2018
 
There are many routes to a bachelor’s degree. The “auto-admission” route from a community college to a four-year university is one of the easiest options available to a UH student.
 

 

 

We’re Teaching Grit the Wrong Way

 
When a person feels grateful, he’ll work harder and longer to pay others back as well as pay favors forward. When a person feels compassion, she’ll give time, money, effort, even a shoulder to cry on to another in need. When a person feels proud, she’ll devote more effort to developing skills that others value, and will be admired for it. Although these sacrifices often cost one pleasure or resources in the moment, they enhance long-term success via the greater rewards that come through continued reciprocal interactions with others.  David DeSteno (professor of psychology at Northeastern University)  March 2018
 
Read the full commentary here: https://bit.ly/2pLXY9w
 

We tried to ignore them — but they took over. We tried getting rid of them — they popped back in greater numbers. Each January and February, just as NYC high-school juniors are dealing with finals and term papers, our inboxes are engulfed by college-admissions marketing e-mails.

 
The College SolutionThe College Solution. I like this site because of the wealth of information. It's not just about money but the big picture and opens your eyes to other opportunities and schools that you may not have considered. I subscribe, have learned a lot and have not paid for anything. The free stuff is great!
 
 
This Will Look Great on My Application...Right?...by Jeff Schiffman  (2.1.18)
I like articles that support what I say to students ALL THE TIME. Don't try to do what you think colleges want you to do. I hear, "It's good for college, right?" This is a good one as a reminder to focus on what really matters.
 

 
College Has Evolved. So Should Your Search
Angel B. Pérez, Vice President, Enrollment and Student Success Trinity College
This article first appeared in the 2018 issue of Parents League Review. © 2018 Parents League of New York www.parentsleague.org.
 
 
Science says parents of successful kids have these 11 things in common
 

Higher-ranked colleges don't necessarily provide a better educational experience

January 10, 2018
Binghamton University
College rankings dominate the conversation regarding quality in postsecondary education, but new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that rankings have little to no relationship to student engagement, an important indicator of collegiate quality.